One of the biggest attractions at the PlayStation Experience at ECTS 2002 was The Getaway, which was playable on about 10 machines, and had a constant crowd surrounding each and every one of them.


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The game is very similar in style to Grand Theft Auto 3, but seems much more graphically advanced than many PS2 titles - that said, the graphics aren't quite as photorealistic as some of the early screens that Sony's development studio have pushed out when the game was first announced.

Driving your chosen vehicle around the London streets is enjoyable, and helped by the fact that the atmosphere of well known landmarks and objects have been recreated perfectly, from phone boxes and traffic lights, to black london cabs, transit vans and red busses.


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Detailing of the vehicles seems good, and the interior detail is fairly astounding, with drivers in cars struggling with the steering wheel, and the single-decker bus driver reaching for the gear stick as you lob it in to reverse.

One very noticeable feature of the driving sections is that there's no onscreen display - you've not got a radar, or arrow pointer telling you where to go, but instead have the indicators on the vehicle that you are driving blinking to show that you either need to turn left or right - it's then up to you to decide which road or shortcut to take so as you're heading in the right direction.


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It doesn't take long before the entire London police force are after you, and there's quite a range of police vehicles that start to pursuit you, from small panda cars, to larger traffic vehicles, and the ever faithful transit van - all of them complete with wailing siren and flashing blue lights.

Some of the vehicles seemed to bounce about quite a lot, especially the single decker bus, which seems a bit odd when you consider that a normal bus almost definitely wouldn't bounce about as you drive it across a kerb, and all of the vehicles seem to have a slightly exagerated suspension to them which sees them pitch and roll a bit as you take corners.


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Once you get to the destination for the specific stage you need to get on foot and find your way around the buildings, performing various tasks, and your character has a good number of moves which allow for some skillful sneaking around, with shimmying along the edge of a wall, and peering around the corner being two of the particularly useful moves on offer.

Gun control and targetting seems as though it's well worked out, and doesn't appear to exhibit any obvious control problems, meaning you've got a fair chance against other gangland criminals, or the gun wielding police officers.


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It's clearly noticeable that the graphics are of a higher quality during the sections of the game that don't involve driving, and there are quite a few objects which are clearly of a photographic quality such as pallets stacked high in a warehouse, each of which shows product labels clearly.

Unfortunately the driving based sections don't seem to offer quite the same graphical level of detail, although you have still got plenty of highly detailed buildings, featuring high street names such as The Link, Jessops and numberous other shops that are instantly recognisable.


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Overall The Getaway is a very impressive title which we'd be very suprised if it doesn't sell by the bucketload when it's released later this year.